While we all wish we could find a perfect rental property and stay there forever, this isn’t always possible. When it comes time to move out of your rental property, you might have questions about how to let your landlord know you wish to end your lease. The solution? Write a lease termination letter.

What is a lease termination letter?

When a tenant wishes to end their lease, they must provide their landlord with official notice. A lease termination letter is a written notice that lets a landlord know a tenant plans to end the lease and move out. Other names for this letter include a notice to vacate and a notice to quit.

It’s important to note that a lease termination letter is different than an eviction notice. A landlord will supply an eviction notice when they wish to force a tenant to vacate for breaking lease terms. Lease termination letters are supplied by tenants, and they are often used when both the tenant and landlord have followed the terms of the lease.

How do I write a lease termination letter?

Writing this letter is easy, as long as you know what to include. Follow these steps to write a deliver a letter that will fulfill the requirements of your lease agreement.

1. Review your lease

Before you start writing, you need to review your lease. The first thing to check for is whether your lease is month-to-month or a fixed term. Most landlords provide different termination requirements for these two types of leases.

For month-to-month leases, landlords generally state a period of notice that tenants must provide before moving out. If your lease does not include this information, refer to your state statutes regarding this required notice. In many states, tenants must provide their landlord with 30 days’ notice before terminating their lease.

If you wish to end a fixed-term lease before the rental period is over, you’ll need to carefully read your lease. Some landlords will allow you to vacate early, as long as you provide proper notice. If there’s nothing in the lease about early termination, talking to your landlord is worth a shot.

Another thing is to check is whether or not your lease will automatically renew at the end of a fixed-term. Even if your lease has a set end period, you may still need to provide advance notice that you plan to terminate your lease once your rental period is over.

2. Write the letter

After you’ve figured out if you are allowed to end your lease, it’s time to write the lease termination letter. Some important items to include are your name, the date, your rental property’s address, and the required amount of notice outlined in your lease.

3. Provide the letter to your landlord

After you’ve written the letter and ensured that the information is accurate, it’s time to deliver it to your landlord. Don’t forget to deliver the letter so you provide your landlord with proper notice. If you don’t, you will be violating your lease terms and may face legal repercussions.

Your lease may require you to deliver a copy in the mail or hand your landlord a copy. If your lease doesn’t state a specific way to deliver the notice, provide both an electronic and paper copy. No matter how you send the notice, be sure to keep a copy for your records.

Lease Termination Letter Sample

Follow this template to craft a letter for your landlord.

[Today’s date]

[Your name]

[Your address]

Dear [landlord’s name],

I wish to inform you that I will be terminating my lease on [date you plan to terminate]. This letter provides the necessary notice of [required notice] as outlined in the lease.

I will move out my belongings and return my keys to [address of property management office] by [date you plan to terminate].

Please mail my security deposit to [your new address] by [period of time your landlord has to return the deposit as outlined in your lease].

Thank you.

Sincerely, 

[Your name]

[Your signature]